The Small Business Administration (SBA) helps develop new businesses in different parts of the country. From helping people start businesses to helping business owners understand the world of business, the SBA is one of the best resources to turn to when a business needs help.

Because of its extensive experience in business development, many organizations turn to the SBA for guidance. This is why the SBA often defines many business terms and systems to help standardize things. In this case, we are looking at how the SBA defines small businesses, why that is important, and how it affects other aspects of business in general.

How Does the SBA Define Small Businesses?

The SBA has a specific definition of a small business. To qualify as a small business, the entity must meet the following criteria: –

  • Have a net worth of less than $7.5 million 
  • Have 500 employees or less 
  • Have less than $25 million in annual revenue 

The net worth of a company is calculated by subtracting the total amount of debt from the total amount of assets. Assets are things like the amount of cash in the bank, the value of vehicles, and the amount of inventory. 

Because the SBA has a specific definition of a small business, companies can use this to their advantage for many reasons. First, if a business is not a small business, it is not eligible for certain programs and services. Second, if a business meets the requirements to be a small business, it is eligible for certain benefits that are not open to non-small businesses.

Why is the SBA’s Definition of a Small Business Important?

The SBA’s definition of a small business is important for many reasons. First, it allows the SBA to provide services to businesses that need them the most. Many of the programs that the SBA provides are only available to small businesses because larger companies have other avenues to help them. 

Second, it allows businesses to receive benefits that they would not be able to receive if they were larger. Let’s say, for example, a small business owner is having a tough time meeting payroll at the end of the month. If the business is not a small business, it is not eligible for financing from the Small Business Administration. On the other hand, if the business is a small business, it can receive financing from the SBA to help it meet its payroll. 

Third, it helps clarify how different businesses are classified. This is important because it allows industries to segment the market and make their products more specific. Finally, it helps the SBA to communicate with businesses. This helps the SBA to standardize its terminology and communicate more effectively with the business community.

How Does the SBA’s Definition of a Small Business Affect Other Businesses?

The SBA’s definition of a small business affects other businesses in a few ways. First, if a business is not a small business and needs to participate in an SBA program, it usually must acquire a “large business certification.” This is a process by which a company makes the SBA aware of its situation and asks to be considered a small business for the purposes of a specific program. 

Second, if a business becomes too large, it will no longer be considered a small business. This is important because it helps to identify businesses that need assistance. 

Third, it allows industries to segment the market. This is important because it allows businesses to focus on the specific type of clientele that they are trying to attract.

What Resources Are Only Available to Small Businesses?

There are many resources that are only available to small businesses because they are the ones that need them most. Let’s look at a few of these resources. 

Financing

Many small businesses are denied financing because they are not creditworthy. However, if a business is a small business, it can apply for financing through the Small Business Administration’s Loan Guarantee Program. This program allows the SBA to guarantee a loan that would otherwise be turned down due to its riskiness. 

Contracting

Small businesses often have difficulty securing federal contracts because they must be large enough to meet the requirements. However, if a business is a small business, it can participate in small-business contracting programs. These programs allow small businesses to compete for federal contracts and help the government meet its small-business contracting goals. 

Contracts

If a business is a small business, it often will have to enter into a contract with its vendors, service providers, and customers. However, there are many different contracts that are only available to small businesses. These contracts include the Simplified Acquisition Procedures (SAP), the Small Business Set-Aside (SBS), and the Small Business Special Contracting Authority (SBA).

SBA Legal Requirements for Small Businesses

There are also a few legal requirements for small businesses. 

First, small businesses often have to enter into a contract with their vendors, service providers, and customers. This is important because it helps to standardize the relationship and protect both parties from liability. 

Second, small businesses often have to file a specific type of tax return. This is important because it helps to streamline the process and makes things easier for the business. 

Third, small businesses are often subject to audits from the IRS. This is important because it ensures that the business is filing its taxes correctly and does not receive an unfair advantage over other taxpayers.

Can Small Businesses Be Highly Profitable?

Yes, small businesses can be highly profitable. In fact, there are many advantages to running a small business. The first advantage of being a small business is that it is easier to manage. Because small businesses have less employees, they are easier to manage. This means that small businesses do not have to devote as much time and energy to things like scheduling and recordkeeping. 

Faster Customer Engagement

Because small businesses are often run by one or two people, they are more responsive to the needs of their customers and vendors. This means that they can often respond to their customers’ needs faster and make more tailored products to fit a particular need. 

Less Overhead

Because small businesses have less overhead than larger businesses, they can often be more profitable. This is important because it allows the business to reinvest its earnings into the business and offer better products and services to its customers.

What Are the Disadvantages of Being a Small Business?

The disadvantages of being a small business are few and far between, but there are still problems that they have to overcome. Here are a few common problems that small businesses have to face. 

Difficulty Raising Capital

The first disadvantage is that it is more difficult to raise capital. In fact, one study found that 80% of small businesses struggle to get funding. This is important because it forces the business to work within its means and think creatively about how to solve problems with less money. 

Difficulty Scaling the Business

Another disadvantage is that it is more difficult to scale the business. Let’s say, for example, a small business has developed a popular product. However, it is unable to produce the product fast enough to meet the demand. On the other hand, a larger business can meet this demand because it has a larger workforce and more resources to manage the inventory. 

Difficulty Managing Risks

Finally, a disadvantage of being a small business is that it is more difficult to manage risk. Because small businesses have less money and fewer resources, they have a harder time managing risk. This means that it is harder for a small business to cover its bases and protect itself in case something goes wrong.

There is Plenty of Help for Small Businesses

Perhaps the biggest advantage for small businesses is that there is a lot of help for small businesses. Since small businesses make up the majority of businesses, and they consistently drive the economy, everyone is focused on providing services, support, and resources for them. If you ever wanted to start a new business, this is one of the best times in history to do so with all of the support that is available. 

You will, eventually, run into trouble trying to keep your customers happy when you don’t have the staff to consistently answer phone calls. Fortunately, there are answering services available to help you pick up the slack. 

At Answer Aide, we provide answering services to businesses of all sizes. The key to keeping customers happy is to be available and responsive at all times. While you may not have the staff for this, you can get help from Answer Aide. We provide answering services when you need them to make sure that your customers are always happy.

If you’re ready to get started with a professional answering service, we’re here to help. Contact Answer Aide by calling (866) 427-3500 or by filling out our online form. We’re happy to partner with you to support your business while it grows.